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A Look at Superior Livestock Auction's Big Horn Classic Video Sale

  This week Superior Livestock Auction's Big Horn Classic Video Sale is underway in Sheridan, WY. Over 117,100 head of calves, feeder cattle and breeding stock were offered here August 23, 24 & 25 during Superior's Big Horn Classic video cattle auction.  Broadcast live from the Holiday Inn, the auction had producers from 32 states consign 33% steer calves 250-650 lbs.; 22% heifer calves 300-650 lbs.; 32% feeder steers 525-1100 lbs.; 12% feeder heifers 525-960 lbs. and 2% breeding stock. Cattle sold on contract to deliver immediately through the end of March 2017. The sale continues Friday, August 26 with over 168,100 head being offered.   CLICK HERE for more results       ***************************************************************          Northcentral States: Colorado, Wyoming, Nebraska                Montana, North and South Dakota and Iowa.     ***************************************************************                   Feeder Steers Medium and Large 1  Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price  Delivery    55      825       825       151.00         151.00   Current     60      840       840       152.50         152.50   Current Value Added   198    850-890     876    143.25-147.00     144.50   Current    114      900       900       140.50         140.50   Current    642    900-920     915    146.50-153.50     150.60   Current Value Added   340      965       965       136.00         136.00   Current    275      985       985       141.00         141.00   Current Value Added   280     1025      1025       130.00         130.00   Current    120      430       430       185.00         185.00   Aug-Sep    220      520       520       159.00         159.00   Aug-Sep Value Added   180      600       600       144.00         144.00   Aug-Sep Calves    65      800       800       143.50         143.50   Aug-Sep    115      440       440       166.00         166.00   Sep        100      480       480       166.00         166.00   Sep        295    500-515     510    160.00-165.00     161.66   Sep        275    550-575     564    151.00-153.50     152.46   Sep        155    600-610     605    146.00-147.00     146.52   Sep     Calves    17      610       610       142.00         142.00   Sep     Split Loads    73      660       660       158.00         158.00   Sep         75      670       670       146.50         146.50   Sep     Calves   459    850-890     877    139.00-147.00     141.57   Sep        896    925-935     934    136.50-140.00     139.52   Sep        205      975       975       137.50         137.50   Sep         60     1065      1065       125.00         125.00   Sep        231    450-485     467    160.00-176.00     167.74   Sep-Oct    317    500-540     526    160.50-162.00     161.52   Sep-Oct     88      575       575       151.50         151.50   Sep-Oct    185    600-625     612    135.00-149.00     142.05   Sep-Oct Calves    71      775       775       145.00         145.00   Sep-Oct    180      850       850       148.75         148.75   Sep-Oct    945    400-430     418    184.00-191.00     186.92   Oct        120    410-430     422    182.00-184.00     182.81   Oct     Split Loads   816    450-490     476    165.00-178.00     170.52   Oct        180    450-480     460    165.00-174.00     170.05   Oct     Split Loads   775    450-485     473    179.00-179.75     179.50   Oct     Value Added  2589    500-545     524    147.00-166.00     157.13   Oct        344    500-540     512    148.00-157.00     153.27   Oct     Split Loads   310    510-530     516    173.50-178.00     176.51   Oct     Value Added  3793    550-590     567    143.50-160.00     151.45   Oct        111    550-560     555    146.50-148.00     147.25   Oct     Split Loads   195      580       580       156.00         156.00   Oct     Value Added    78      620       620       151.00         151.00   Oct       2580    600-640     611    140.00-156.00     149.35   Oct     Calves   115      600       600    142.00-143.00     142.52   Oct     Split Loads   375    620-630     625    147.00-155.50     150.93   Oct     Value Added    85      650       650       144.00         144.00   Oct        345    650-660     653    140.50-149.00     145.24   Oct     Calves   111    750-755     752    144.00-147.50     146.01   Oct        120      800       800       147.50         147.50   Oct        352    850-875     859    138.00-145.50     143.71   Oct         54      925       925       137.00         137.00   Oct        371    950-975     962    132.00-139.50     136.56   Oct         16      960       960       128.50         128.50   Oct     Split Loads    55      425       425       180.00         180.00   Oct-Nov Split Loads   400      490       490       165.50         165.50   Oct-Nov    110      450       450    155.00-167.00     162.64   Oct-Nov Split Loads   595    500-535     514    151.00-168.00     160.61   Oct-Nov   1221    560-585     569    140.50-162.50     148.68   Oct-Nov    250    620-625     623    143.00-146.50     144.60   Oct-Nov    145    600-640     623    140.00-146.00     143.36   Oct-Nov Split Loads   150      720       720       146.00         146.00   Oct-Nov    148      740       740       150.00         150.00   Oct-Nov Calves   180      800       800       147.00         147.00   Oct-Nov    125      425       425       190.00         190.00   Nov        115      435       435       186.50         186.50   Nov     Calves    97    430-440     436    166.00-179.00     173.71   Nov     Split Loads   426      480       480       170.00         170.00   Nov        627    525-540     536    144.00-165.00     156.12   Nov        115    500-540     521    149.00-164.00     155.89   Nov     Split Loads  1169    550-590     563    143.00-158.00     149.49   Nov         60      585       585       155.00         155.00   Nov     Split Loads   591    600-630     616    138.00-145.00     143.24   Nov     Calves   355    650-675     657    136.00-144.00     141.02   Nov        395    650-675     661    143.50-147.00     145.64   Nov     Calves   100      530       530       151.00         151.00   Nov-Dec    462    600-625     603    140.00-143.50     140.49   Nov-Dec    405      650       650    137.00-138.50     137.69   Nov-Dec     73      825       825       156.00         156.00   Nov-Dec     58      850       850       135.00         135.00   Nov-Dec    185    560-580     571    157.00-159.50     158.13   Dec        100      625       625       144.50         144.50   Dec        150      650       650       145.00         145.00   Dec         57      675       675       136.00         136.00   Dec     Split Loads    67      750       750       133.50         133.50   Dec        155      675       675       140.00         140.00   Jan         60      790       790       121.00         121.00   Jan                      Feeder Steers Medium and Large 1-2  Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price  Delivery    85      500       500       142.00         142.00   Sep     Split Loads    65      825       825       129.00         129.00   Sep        362      540       540    141.50-146.00     142.64   Oct        120    500-515     508    145.00-149.00     147.03   Oct     Split Loads    78      615       615       139.25         139.25   Oct     Calves   496      500       500    157.00-168.00     165.87   Oct-Nov     60      525       525       147.00         147.00   Oct-Nov Split Loads   168    550-590     567    145.50-148.50     147.20   Oct-Nov    180      600       600       138.00         138.00   Oct-Nov Calves    60      525       525       159.00         159.00   Nov     Split Loads   300      600       600       138.00         138.00   Nov     Calves                 Feeder Steers Small and Medium 3  Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price  Delivery   160      600       600        76.00          76.00   Oct     Mexican Origin                   Feeder Holstein Steers Large 3  Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price  Delivery    70      700       700        94.00          94.00   Oct                      Feeder Heifers Medium and Large 1  Head   Wt Range   Avg Wt    Price Range   Avg Price  Delivery   120      825       825       136.50         136.50   Current Spayed    57      875       875       133.50         133.50   Current    325      875       875       130.50         130.50   Current Spayed    55      900       900       129.00         129.00   Current    115      430       430       157.00         157.00   Aug-Sep Value Added   180      580       580       132.00         132.00   Aug-Sep    100      480       480       145.50         145.50   Sep        215    500-525     512    139.00-149.00     143.99   Sep         81      565       565       139.00         139.00   Sep         76      635       635       139.00         139.00   Sep         52      610       610       142.00         142.00   Sep     Split Loads   394      750       750    132.00-138.50     133.55   Sep        128      750       750       137.00         137.00   Sep     Spayed    92      800       800       134.00         134.00   Sep        538    815-825     819    134.75-136.25     135.60   Sep     Spayed    60      825       825       147.00         147.00   Sep     Value Added   617    850-890     877    130.50-134.50     132.16   Sep         70      850       850       134.50         134.50   Sep     Spayed   170      800       800       137.50         137.50   Sep-Oct    120      850       850       134.00         134.00   Sep-Oct    470    400-440     420    152.50-179.00     164.16   Oct        235    400-430     412    157.00-170.00     164.46   Oct     Split Loads   200      420       420       172.00         172.00   Oct     Value Added   100      475       475       156.00         156.00   Oct        231    450-485     472    140.00-153.00     144.07   Oct     Split Loads  2387    ...

Researchers Find Flood Irrigation Benefits Not Just Agriculture

Western Confluence reports:   Ranchers today in the Upper Green River Basin say they are modern-day beavers. Typically, tributaries to the Green River, fed by mountain snow melt, surge in May and June and dwindle to nearly nothing in late summer and fall. However, as ranchers divert water out of these streams to flood fields and irrigate native hay for winter livestock fodder, the water seeps into the soil and makes its way slowly back to the streams later in the summer. That process, slowing the water as it moves downstream, mimics how beaver dams, once abundant in the area, trap water and let it seep out through the summer.   Although ranchers have long believed that flooding fields benefits wildlife through increases in late season flow, nobody had proved it. In fall of 2013, University of Wyoming Agricultural and Applied Economics master’s student Spencer Blevins set out to do just that. Blevins’ goal was to take a first step toward placing a dollar value on the non-agricultural benefits of flood irrigation. How much are those benefits worth to people who enjoy hunting, fishing, and birding?     Members of UW faculty involved in the Upper Green River Basin Conservation Exchange, an ongoing effort to establish a market for private investment in ecosystem services, guided Blevins’ work. The exchange will pay ranchers for the ecosystem services the ranches provide. Blevins’ study was designed to determine whether the non-agricultural benefits of flood irrigation were significant enough that a conservation investor might be willing to pay for them.    Several factors could change irrigation practices in the Upper Green River Basin, with potential repercussions for stream flows throughout the summer. Some ranchers face economic incentives to subdivide their land for residential development, in which case irrigation stops altogether. Alternatively, if hay prices go up, ranchers could face economic pressure to adopt more efficient irrigation technology such as center-pivot There is a great deal to be learned from this study.   Blevins was able to show that the non-agricultural benefits of flood irrigating are potentially quite significant and comparable in magnitude to revenues from alternative land uses. If managers or conservation groups find a way to compensate private landowners for the full benefits their flood irrigation provides, it could affect their future land use decisions. “Wasteful” flood irrigation is not so wasteful after all, at least in a mountain valley with alluvial soils such as the New Fork, and in fact helps everyone from ranchers to trout to fishing guides, in unexpected ways. CLICK HERE to read more Source:  The Montana Conservationist    UW Extension photo

R-CALF USA's Attorneys Seek Quick End to Beef Checkoff Lawsuit

  Billings, Mont. - In response to the government's August motion to dismiss or stay the lawsuit R-CALF USA filed against the national beef checkoff program (Beef Checkoff) in May, late yesterday R-CALF USA's attorneys asked the court to award R-CALF USA summary judgment and immediately end the program's unconstitutional taxation of ranchers.   The group's lawsuit alleges the government, represented by Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), is operating the Beef Checkoff in a manner that violates the U.S. Constitution. According to the lawsuit, the Beef Checkoff, which compels producers to pay $1 per head every time cattle are sold, is a federal tax that funds the private speech of the Montana Beef Council. The group states that the council's private speech is objectionable because it promotes the message that there is no difference between domestic beef produced under U.S. food safety laws and beef produced in foreign countries.   Compelling citizens to subsidize private speech violates the First Amendment, the group says.   In its August motion, the government barely contested R-CALF USA's claim that the checkoff had been an unconstitutional, compelled subsidy. Instead, USDA argued the subsidy was no longer compelled because the agency is currently promulgating a new rule that would allow producers in most states to petition their respective state beef councils to redirect checkoff dollars away from those private state councils and to the federal Beef Checkoff program, which is operated under the direct supervision of the USDA.   Citing the proposed rule, the government moved to either dismiss or to stay the case, saying it believes the disputed tax distribution will be resolved through its rulemaking process.   In R-CALF USA's motion it states that the government's proposed solution is woefully inadequate. The group asserts that a violation of the Constitution cannot be remedied by imposing an additional burden on independent cattle producers though an opt-out scheme. Instead, the Constitution requires the government first obtain the affirmative consent from those who are required to pay the federal cattle tax before it can use those taxes to fund private speech.   "There is no reason to continue unconstitutionally taxing America's independent ranchers when the government already admits it should have never happened in the first place," said David Muraskin, Food Project attorney with Public Justice, who represents R-CALF, USA. "Every day that passes without action is another day ranchers are taxed and more money is improperly funneled to programs that harm them. There is no disagreement when it comes to ending this policy, and there is no reason the court should allow it to continue for even one day more."       Dudley Butler, former USDA administrator, said, "The Beef Checkoff has been a complete debacle.  It has taxed independent ranchers for decades and provided no real benefit. It has subsidized meatpackers and special interest groups who want cattle ranchers to become serfs on their own land like poultry growers.  All the while USDA has looked the other way."   According to R-CALF USA CEO Bill Bullard, the group's membership voted overwhelmingly in 2014 to direct R-CALF USA to work for the repeal of the current Beef Checkoff because it was fraught with corruption and abuse.   "We filed our lawsuit only after Secretary Vilsack and his USDA refused to follow through with any of the reforms they had said were necessary since 2010. It is quite alarming that independent U.S. ranchers have been forced for 30 years to advertise beef produced by their foreign competitors and it is our hope that our organization can soon put an end to this once and for all," Bullard said.   In addition to Public Justice and the Butler Farm & Ranch Law Group, R-CALF USA is also represented by Bill Rossbach of Rossbach Law, P.C. in Missoula, Montana.   Source:  R-CALF USA